Exploring Early Modern Books: A Workshop

Exploring Early Modern Books: A Workshop

25-26 June 2018

Special Collections, Arts and Social Sciences Library

University of Bristol

On 25-26 June 2018, the Centre for Material Texts at the University of Bristol is organizing a two-day intensive workshop for students from any discipline who want to know more about early modern print culture. By working closely with items from Special Collections at the University of Bristol’s Arts and Social Sciences Library, participants in the workshop will develop skills in handling and studying printed books of the early modern period (c. 1500-1800). The workshop is for anyone who wants to discover more about early modern printed books: about how they are made and how that making might impact upon their contents; about how they might be interpreted as objects; about how to find your way around rare book libraries and special collections departments; and about the importance of engaging with the material in our increasingly digital age.

Bale again

The workshop will be taught by specialists in early modern book history, including Rhiannon Daniels, John McTague, and Jennifer Batt. The workshop is based in Special Collections in the University of Bristol’s Arts and Social Sciences Library, and will draw on the library’s holdings, which range from poetry to geology, children’s literature to international history (and much much more) and cover languages including English, French, German, Italian, and Latin.

SC000049The course will be of particular value to anyone who is thinking about pursuing research (at MA/PhD) in topics in the early modern period (c. 1500-1800), but we welcome anyone with an interest in the area.

Attendance at the workshop is free, but places are limited, so you’ll need to apply to attend on the registration form here by 24 May 2018. Successful applicants will be notified by 1 June 2018. Some bursaries are available to support travel and accommodation costs; please indicate if you’d like to be considered for a bursary on the registration form.

 

FAQ

When does the course take place?

The course will take place on Monday 25 and Tuesday 26 June 2018, and will run from c. 9.30-5.30 on both days.

Where does the course take place?

The course will take place in Special Collections in the Arts and Social Sciences Library, University of Bristol. You can find the ASSL on this map.

For more information about Special Collections, see here.

Who is it for?

The workshop is aimed at students of all disciplines who have an interest in knowing more about books as objects, and in thinking about how this knowledge might feed into an understanding of historical, cultural, and intellectual developments in the early modern period.

The course will be of particular value to anyone who is thinking about pursuing research (at MA/PhD) in topics in the early modern period (c. 1500-1800), but we welcome anyone with an interest in the area.

Do I need to be a student at the University of Bristol to attend?

No! Students attending other universities are also welcome. And if you’re not currently a student but would like to attend, do get in touch with Jenny Batt at arts-books[at]bristol.ac.uk

What will I learn?

The workshop is designed to help participants develop a toolkit for approaching the study of early modern books. Topics that the workshop will cover incluSC002579de:

  • How to discover the early modern books that relate to your research interests
  • How books were made in the early modern period, and how that might impact on their contents
  • How to navigate your way through an early modern book
  • The value of returning to the material object in our increasingly digital world.

We’ll be exploring these questions, and others, by looking at a wide range of early modern books from Special Collections. The holdings range widely (from poetry to geology, children’s literature to international history, and much much more) and cover languages including English, French, German, Italian, and Latin, so whatever your disciplinary background, you should find something to interest you.

Who is teaching on this workshop?

Rhiannon Daniels is Senior Lecturer in Italian at the University of Bristol, and one of the co-directors of the Centre for Material Texts. Her current research focuses on editions of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron printed before 1600, including quantitative approaches to bibliographical data, modes of reading in the first century of print, editorial fashioning and close readings of paratextual material such as dedications and biographies, as well as the social and material networks connecting Italian print shops.

John McTague is Lecturer in English at the University of Bristol, and one of the co-directors of the Centre for Material Texts. His current research focuses on the historiographical work done by political pamphlets, broadsides ballads and topical poetry in the seventeenth and eighteenth century, ‘practical satire’ (i.e. hoaxes and practical jokes), the correspondence of John Dryden, and the development of digital tools for visualising textual variation over time (using Alexander Pope’s Dunciads as a case study).

Jennifer Batt is Lecturer in English at the University of Bristol, and one of the co-directors of the Centre for Material Texts. Her current research focuses on how eighteenth century poetry was published in newspapers and magazines.

There will also be a number of guest speakers at the workshop, who will be sharing some of the ways that book history has been central to their research. Details tbc.

Throughout the workshop, we’ll also be drawing on the invaluable expertise of the Special Collections librarians, Michael Richardson and Hannah Lowery.

How do I apply?

You can apply to attend the course by filling out the application form here. Please apply by 24 May 2018; we’ll let successful applicants know by 1 June 2018.

How much does it cost?

Attendance at the workshop is free, and includes lunch on both days. Places are limited, so you’ll need to sign up on the application form here.

Some bursaries are available to support travel and accommodation costs; please indicate if you’d like to be considered for a bursary on the application form.

Who is organizing the course?

The course is organized by the Centre for Material Texts at the University of Bristol. You can find out more about the Centre here.

I’m coming from outside Bristol to attend the workshop. Can you help me to find accommodation?Image for The End of the Book(1)

You can find some guidance on finding accommodation here.

Who do I contact if I have any questions?

Send any questions to Jenny Batt at arts-books[at]bristol.ac.uk.

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